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Topic: WORSHIP

Worship is transcendent wonder.
Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881), Scottish essayist, historian. On Heroes and Hero-Worship, lecture 1, "The Hero as Divinity" (1841).
Comment: Worship ought to be transcendent wonder. But today it is rock and roll entertainment. Is there something not quite right with this picture? When you truly worship God, you know it, and He knows it. Whether there is a band or not makes no difference to God. For God hears not the music of the band but the music of your heart. PK

I have always been a friend to hero-worship; it is the only rational one, and has always been in use amongst civilized people—the worship of spirits is synonymous with barbarism—it is mere fetish…. There is something philosophic in the worship of the heroes of the human race.George Borrow (1803–81), English author. An "elderly individual," in Lavengro, ch. 23 (1851).
Comment: What ignorance. Worldly wisdom, as spoken here, is snobbery at its pinnacle. We worship Christ who is not a hero because Christ humbled himself, sought no glory for Himself, and who was innocent yet sacrifice Himself not for glory, but for each of us. The problems of the world are rooted in sin…the kind of sin that tries to find a human hero to look up to. All human heroes lose their life and they fade from the memory of humanity. Christ has never faded. Christ died but came back. Christ is infinite in love, wisdom, and forgiveness. PK

It is only when men begin to worship that they begin to grow.
Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933), U.S. Republican politician, president. Speech, 6 July 1922, Fredericksburg, Va.

When we really worship anything, we love not only its clearness but its obscurity. We exult in its very invisibility.
G. K. Chesterton (1874–1936), British author. All Things Considered, "The Fallacy of Success" (1908).
Comment: We must not worship things, but Christ the Son, God the Father, and the Holy Spirit. When we worship anyone or anything other than these three in one, we have lost our focus, do not see clearly, and get lost in the obscurity of the thing. PK

Hero-worship is strongest where there is least regard for human freedom.
Herbert Spencer (1820–1903), English philosopher. Social Statistics, pt. 4, ch. 30, sct. 6 (1850).
Comment: In Christ we do not have a human hero, we have a humble man who is God who came to earth to rescue us from our sins if we are only willing to reach out our hearts and souls for help. PK

I daresay anything can be made holy by being sincerely worshipped.
Iris Murdoch (b. 1919), British novelist, philosopher. Maisie Tether, in The Message to the Planet, pt. 5 (1989).
Comment: Another comment showing the emptiness of the most educated. Things are made holy by God not man. No matter how sincerely we might worship a person, thing, or idea, its holiness or lack thereof is not determined by man, but by our Creator. PK

If youth is the period of hero-worship, so also is it true that hero-worship, more than anything else, perhaps, gives one the sense of youth. To admire, to expand one’s self, to forget the rut, to have a sense of newness and life and hope, is to feel young at any time of life.
Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 8 (1902).
Comment: Nothing is as invigorating as to look across the horizon and see a new land and new life awaiting us. Praise be to God that Christ is there waving at us, cheering us on, telling us to keep on keeping on, and telling us to hang tough for the wait is almost over.

Reverence is the highest quality of man’s nature; and that individual, or nation, which has it slightly developed, is so far unfortunate. It is a strong spiritual instinct, and seeks to form channels for itself where none exists; thus Americans, in the dearth of other objects to worship, fall to worshiping themselves.
Lydia M. Child (1802–80), U.S. abolitionist, writer, editor. Letter, 26 May 1843 (published in Letters from New York, vol. 1, letter 18, 1843).
Comment: Let us worship God and Him only. Let us worship Him in truth and in love. PK

So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.
Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), British author. Ends and Means, ch. 8 (1937).
Comment: Yes they will. PK

I do honour the very flea of his dog.
Ben Jonson (1573–1637), English dramatist, poet. Cob, in Every Man in His Humour, act 4, sc. 4.
Comment: Everyone desires and deserves to be loved. You can ignore the fleas and the dog just so you love the person. PK

The Americans are certainly hero-worshippers, and always take their heroes from the criminal classes.
Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Letter, 19 April 1882.
Comment: Sometimes, but not always. Instead of worshipping heroes, we should worship Christ. PK

There is probably an element of malice in the readiness to overestimate people: we are laying up for ourselves the pleasure of later cutting them down to size.
Eric Hoffer (1902–83), U.S. philosopher. Reflections on the Human Condition, aph. 129 (1973).
Comment: An example of the darkness of the human heart is herewith given by Mr. Hoffer. PK

I have always been a friend to hero-worship; it is the only rational one, and has always been in use amongst civilized people—the worship of spirits is synonymous with barbarism—it is mere fetish…. There is something philosophic in the worship of the heroes of the human race.George Borrow (1803–81), English author. An "elderly individual," in Lavengro, ch. 23 (1851).
Comment: What ignorance. Worldly wisdom, as spoken here, is snobbery at its pinnacle. We worship Christ who is not a hero because Christ humbled himself, sought no glory for Himself, and who was innocent yet sacrifice Himself not for glory, but for each of us. The problems of the world are rooted in sin…the kind of sin that tries to find a human hero to look up to. All human heroes lose their life and they fade from the memory of humanity. Christ has never faded. Christ died but came back. Christ is infinite in love, wisdom, and forgiveness. PK

It is only when men begin to worship that they begin to grow.
Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933), U.S. Republican politician, president. Speech, 6 July 1922, Fredericksburg, Va.

When we really worship anything, we love not only its clearness but its obscurity. We exult in its very invisibility.
G. K. Chesterton (1874–1936), British author. All Things Considered, "The Fallacy of Success" (1908).
Comment: We must not worship things, but Christ the Son, God the Father, and the Holy Spirit. When we worship anyone or anything other than these three in one, we have lost our focus, do not see clearly, and get lost in the obscurity of the thing. PK

Hero-worship is strongest where there is least regard for human freedom.
Herbert Spencer (1820–1903), English philosopher. Social Statistics, pt. 4, ch. 30, sct. 6 (1850).
Comment: In Christ we do not have a human hero, we have a humble man who is God who came to earth to rescue us from our sins if we are only willing to reach out our hearts and souls for help. PK

I daresay anything can be made holy by being sincerely worshipped.
Iris Murdoch (b. 1919), British novelist, philosopher. Maisie Tether, in The Message to the Planet, pt. 5 (1989).
Comment: Another comment showing the emptiness of the most educated. Things are made holy by God not man. No matter how sincerely we might worship a person, thing, or idea, its holiness or lack thereof is not determined by man, but by our Creator. PK

If youth is the period of hero-worship, so also is it true that hero-worship, more than anything else, perhaps, gives one the sense of youth. To admire, to expand one’s self, to forget the rut, to have a sense of newness and life and hope, is to feel young at any time of life.
Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 8 (1902).
Comment: Nothing is as invigorating as to look across the horizon and see a new land and new life awaiting us. Praise be to God that Christ is there waving at us, cheering us on, telling us to keep on keeping on, and telling us to hang tough for the wait is almost over.

Reverence is the highest quality of man’s nature; and that individual, or nation, which has it slightly developed, is so far unfortunate. It is a strong spiritual instinct, and seeks to form channels for itself where none exists; thus Americans, in the dearth of other objects to worship, fall to worshiping themselves.
Lydia M. Child (1802–80), U.S. abolitionist, writer, editor. Letter, 26 May 1843 (published in Letters from New York, vol. 1, letter 18, 1843).
Comment: Let us worship God and Him only. Let us worship Him in truth and in love. PK

So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.
Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), British author. Ends and Means, ch. 8 (1937).
Comment: Yes they will. PK

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Scripture quotations marked (RSV) are taken from the HOLY BIBLE, Revised Standard Version of the Bible, Copyright © 1952 [2nd edition, 1971] by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.


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